Don Eli

Don Eli

Costa Rica

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Pastora is the name of Don Elis farm and is the one with the highest altitude. Up to 2000 masl. It's also located in one of the greatest coffee areas in Costa Rica : Tarrazú. Carlos and his entire family are deeply involved at Don Eli Coffee farm and micro mill. With support of the family Carlos is managing both farming and the milling. He is separating by picking dates, blocks on his different small farms as well as by process. Local pickers are selecting the ripest cherries. It’s then mechanically demucilaged before sun dried on raised beds.

Process: With the Eco Pulper they are able to adjust the amount of mucilage they want to remove before fermenting or drying. In this case it is a “white honey” meaning they mechanically remove around 70-80% mucilage and then take it straight to the drying beds.

Drying: They move the coffee in buckets to the African beds inside an open greenhouse with African beds in several levels. Mariajose, Carlos daughter, and another worker are in charge of the drying phase. They move the coffee every hour evenly and keep a track of every coffee that comes inside the greenhouse to dry. The coffee takes around 10-12 days to get to the right moisture content 10%-10,5%. This year Carlos implement different levels so he could dry the coffee slower and it also helps him to have more space to dry coffee.

Complex, structured with a lot of mature fruit, plums and ripe black berries. Good depth and viscousity
Recipe
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DOSE BREW WATER TIME TEMP
16 gr. 255 gr. 2:45 94º
PHOTOS
Carlos Montero, producer at Don Elis Farm
Carlos Montero, producer at Don Elis Farm.
Lizard and parchment coffee on a drying net
Tiny lizard, and washed processed coffee in parchment on a drying net.
African beds, honey processed coffee and a stirring tool. The coffee is protected from the weather kept under an open greenhouse
African beds, honey processed coffee and a stirring tool. The coffee is protected from the weather kept under an open greenhouse.
Montero's house
Montero's house.
Carlos doing some maintenance on his truck
Carlos doing some maintenance on his truck.
Some healthy Arabica trees, and beautiful view of the surrounding mountains Some healthy Arabica trees, and beautiful view of the surrounding mountains Some healthy Arabica trees, and beautiful view of the surrounding mountains Some healthy Arabica trees, and beautiful view of the surrounding mountains Some healthy Arabica trees, and beautiful view of the surrounding mountains Some healthy Arabica trees, and beautiful view of the surrounding mountains
Some healthy Arabica trees, and beautiful view of the surrounding mountains.
Carlos measuring the coffee by cajuelas. More cajuelas means more money for a picker in Costa Rica
Carlos measuring the coffee by cajuelas. More cajuelas means more money for a picker in Costa Rica.
Coffee cherries entering the Eco Pulper Coffee cherries inside the Eco Pulper
Coffee cherries entering, and inside the Eco Pulper.
Carlos Montero and Morten Wennersgaard from Nordic Approach
Carlos Montero and Morten Wennersgaard from Nordic Approach. Honey processed on the left, and washed coffee on the right.
DETAILS
  • ORIGIN : Costa Rica, San José, Tarrazú, Pastora
  • ALTITUDE : 1900 masl
  • HARVEST : Mar. 2017
  • PROCESS : White Honey. Carlos started this year to be more aware and to pay more attention to his staff and the cherry sorting. He makes sure the pickers have sorted and separated the unripe cherries they picked and put them in a different bag before he measures the coffee by cajuelas (A standard volume measurement for coffee cherry used in Costa Rica). Carlos and his son Jacob are a team when they process the coffee. After Carlos measures the coffee for he’s pickers, usually in the afternoon, he takes the cherries to his mill, where Jacob is waiting for him to start to process the coffee. They move the coffee cherries from the truck to a big pile and throw some clean water on the pile to wash the cherries and to help move the cherries to continue their way to the the depulping machine that separates the pulp and skin from the beans. After this the beans are moved to the machines that washes the coffee. At the end of this step the coffee is moved through a tube by the water pressure to a big tank. By the time the coffee gets to the big tank the mucilage has been almost completely removed, however the beans still keep a little amount of mucilage, and that’s why Carlos called the process white honey.
  • DRYING : After the coffee is moved to the big tank, they move the coffee in buckets to the African beds inside an open greenhouse. Mariajose, Carlos daughter, and another worker are in charge of the drying phase. They move the coffee every hour evenly and keep a track of every coffee that comes inside the greenhouse to dry. The coffee takes around 10-12 days to get to the right moisture content 10%-10,5%. This year Carlos implement different levels so he could dry the coffee slower and it also helps him to have more space to dry coffee.
  • CULTIVAR : Catuai
  • HUMIDITY : 10.2 %
  • GREEN DENSITY : 669.5 g/L
  • ROASTED DENSITY : 447.9 g/L

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